The best loved diesel cars of all time

The Telegraph’s Tim Gibson reveals his top nine diesel cars and needs your help to complete his 10-strong Diesel Hall of Fame.

There are many ways you can love your car, from cleaning and polishing it to using specially formulated fuels to protect its engine. But some cars deserve more love than others. Over a lifetime spent writing about motors, the Telegraph’s Tim Gibson has been compiling a mental list of the best diesels ever. Here he finally gets the chance to share his top nine. The tenth is for you to decide…

Peugeot 405 (1988–97) /
Citroën BX Turbo Diesel (1982–94)
These cars both made use of the legendary XUD turbo-diesel engine from PSA Peugeot-Citroën. That means they share great driving dynamics, frugality and longevity. Their French origins mean they are pleasingly stylish and slightly quirky.
Peugeot 405

• Loved for their: Gallic charm and unusual looks

Austin Montego Countryman 2.0 D (1984–95)
The Montego may seem a surprising inclusion, but history will judge it to be a triumph of automotive design. In Countryman trim, it was comfy, well specced and elegantly styled. And the 2.0-litre Perkins-derived diesel lump is pretty much bombproof.
A navy Austin Montego

• Loved for its: status as a Great British classic

Mercedes-Benz W124 E250 Diesel (1985–95)
The W124 is one of the most reliable cars ever made, and a joy to live with. People pay thousands to have examples restored, and they will go on giving loyal, economical service for decades to come. A dream motor car.
Mercedes-Benz W124 E250 Diesel
• Loved for its: utter reliability, no matter what you throw at it

Land Rover Discovery 300 Tdi (1994–98)
The first-generation Disco changed Land Rover’s fortunes, signalling an important phase in its transition from farmers’ favourite to luxury carmaker. Purists regard the 200 Tdi as the best version, but the 300-series is quieter, with a touch more refinement.
Land Rover Discovery 300 Tdi

• Loved for its: rugged image and everyday driveability

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